From Prince Harry's 20 year fight with mental health, Lady Gaga's PTSD, to J.K. Rowling's battle with depression, there are no shortage of high-profile figures raising awareness of mental health illnesses. So why is there is a shortage of effective solutions to help the growing number of children suffering with depression?

Coming to terms with the loss of a parent at the age of 12 is not something many of us can relate to. Having to cope with such grief in the public eye is simply unimaginable. So how did the Prince cope with the death of his mum, the Princess of Wales? The simple answer is, he didn't. In a very candid interview about his own struggles with mental health, the modern young royal spoke openly about how Diana's death affected his mental wellbeing from childhood. 

Recent studies and aging statistics show us children’s mental well-being needs to be given careful consideration and attention; charities with high profile backing are bringing the subject to the mainstream media.  Despite this issue in a technically driven world, no new solutions have been available to support children, until now.

Halloween can conjure up many images. For some it is a fun time characterised by copious amounts of sugar-filled sweets and silly costumes. However, clearly Halloween has a darker side. For parents and teachers though the scariest thing that won’t be seen this Halloween is the truly shocking state of children’s mental wellbeing. But let’s scrutinise Halloween for a moment, ghosts and clowns are usually creepy but Halloween makes them acceptable. Mental health and fears should be treated in the same way.

As many as 1 in 6 young people in the UK will experience an anxiety disorder at some point in their lives. Surely, we should be making every effort to educate children about the issues surrounding mental health while they are young, in order to avoid a lack of understanding in later life. Is the fact that this isn’t happening due to the stigma around mental health issues as a whole?